2

MULTI-DISCIPLINARY EXCELLENCE

Our approach to cancer care is best defined by our unique Cancer Management Teams (CMTs). We believe that cancer is a complex enemy; conquering it demands the coming together of the finest experts in specific cancer groups.

Each CMT, at the Apollo Proton Cancer Centre, is made up of specialists who straddle diverse disciplines like Surgery, Radiation & Medical Oncology, Pathology, Rehabilitation and several others. A CMT is further fortified by world-class support staff like nurses, dieticians, therapists and clinical trial coordinators. These experts play a pivotal role in drawing up the treatment blueprint based on vast experience, the unique needs of the patients and the collective expertise of the team.

GI Cancer CMT

SETTING NEW BENCHMARKS IN CINICAL CARE AND OUTCOMES IN COMBATING CANCERS OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM

Gastro-Intestinal (GI) cancer is a term for the group of cancers that affect the digestive system. This includes cancers of the liver, gallbladder, pancreas, stomach, small intestine, bowel (large intestine or colon and rectum), and anus. Gastrointestinal (GI) CMT at APCC is driven by the mission of providing cutting-edge multidisciplinary care for patients and to advance the clinical and basic science behind GI malignancies.

APCC combines innovative, genetically targeted therapies with leading-edge surgical techniques that work best to treat your specific cancer. Your personalized treatment plan may include a combination of therapies

APCC’s radiation team uses state-of-the-art technologies for radiation therapy, including Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and Image-Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) to treat tumours of the GI.


Surgery

Surgery may be done to remove the cancer and part or all of the stomach and some nearby lymph nodes, depending on the type and stage of stomach cancer. The surgeon will try to leave behind as much normal stomach as possible. Sometimes other organs will need to be removed as well.

Even when the cancer is too widespread to be removed completely, patients may be helped by surgery because it may help prevent bleeding from the tumour or prevent the stomach from being blocked by tumour growth. The type of operation usually depends on what part of the stomach the cancer is in and how much cancer is in the surrounding tissue.


Radiation Therapy

External beam radiation therapy is often used to treat stomach cancer. This treatment focuses radiation on the cancer from a machine outside the body. Often, special types of external beam radiation, such as Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) are used. These use computers and special techniques to focus the radiation on the cancer and limit the damage to nearby normal tissues.


Proton therapy

Advanced proton therapy allows high precision and high-dose radiation to the tumours and cancerous cells found in the digestive tract, and reduce the dose to surrounding healthy tissues and critical organs.


Chemotherapy and Targeted therapy

Our medical oncologists deploy advanced therapeutics to destroy cancer cells and control their growth. Our treatment modalities also include drugs or other targeted therapies to identify and attack specific types of cancer cells, blocking their growth and spread.


Targeted Therapies

APCC experts are currently assessing the effectiveness of using targeted therapies for GI cancer. Certain agents have shown promise in blocking the development and growth of tumours. We determine which targeted therapy is best for you based on the unique characteristics of your tumour, and give these drugs in combination with chemotherapy.


Genetic counselling and testing

APCC experts are currently assessing the effectiveness of using targeted therapies for GI cancer. Certain agents have shown promise in blocking the development and growth of tumours. We determine which targeted therapy is best for you based on the unique characteristics of your tumour, and give these drugs in combination with chemotherapy.


Liver Cancer

The liver is one of the most radiosensitive organs, making radiation therapy for liver tumours extremely challenging. Proton Beam Therapy (PBT) delivers less dose to the liver than photon therapy and is expected to reduce toxicity while also permitting safe dose escalation for some patients with liver tumours.

Proton radiotherapy has seen an increasing role in the treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC). Historically, external beam radiotherapy has played a very limited role in HCC due to a high incidence of toxicity to surrounding normal structures. The ability to deliver a high dose of radiation to the tumour is a key factor in improving outcomes in HCC. Proton beams do not have an exit dose along the beam path once they enter the body. The inherent physical attributes of proton radiotherapy offer a way to maximize tumour control via dose escalation while avoiding excessive radiation to the remaining liver, thus increasing biological effectiveness.

Many types of cancer, including those of the head and neck, colon and rectum, breast, lung, oesophagus, and pancreas, can spread to the liver. Since blood from all parts of the body must pass through the liver for filtration, cancer cells from other organs and tissues that reach the liver can lodge and grow into secondary tumours. Proton radiation therapy can successfully treat metastases to the liver and provide new hope for patients afflicted with advanced cancer with recent emerging evidence.

 

APOLLO cancer FOUNDATION

A mission to make cancer care in India more inclusive and accessible.

VOLUNTEER AT APCC

Participate and pledge your support to make cancer conquerable.

Help us set a new world
standard in care

X

Get in touch

Please fill out the information so we can get back to you


Please select who you are?
Please enter your first name.
Please enter your last name
Please enter your city.
Please enter your country
Please select language
Please select your communication preference
Please enter valid mobile no
Please enter valid email
Invalid Input
Enter the Verification Code
RefreshInvalid captcha